Science Intelligence and InfoPros

Little things about Scientitic Watch and Information Professionnals

Open Access: still in progress (Research Information)

leave a comment »

2 articles in the latest issue of Research Information show that OA is still growing but also needs to improve some processes.

Some findings from a survey made by Wiley:

  • 79 % of surveyed authors see open access as more prevalent in their discipline than it was three years ago
  • Reasons that authors gave for not yet having published under an open-access model included a lack of high profile open-access journals (48 per cent), lack of funding (44 per cent) and concerns about quality (34 per cent). Authors said they would publish in an open-access journal if it had a high impact factor, if it were well regarded and if it had a rigorous peer-review process.
  • The highest proportion of open-access authors came from a medical background (28 per cent), closely followed by biological sciences (24 per cent)

and a discussion around the new model of publication, the CC-BY license:

The CC-BY licence condition, defined by Creative Commons, allows modification and reuse of content, including commercially, provided that the original author is properly attributed. (…) However, there are concerns with the implications of the licence. Because CC-BY allows for commercial reuse of content it could theoretically be published again, behind a paywall, which might seem to contradict some of the aims of open access. And there may be some uses that researchers are uncomfortable with. For example, medical researchers might be unhappy with parts of their papers being used to promote a particular drug

 

OA gains ground with authors, says study. Research Information, 30 october 2012. Available from: http://www.researchinformation.info/news/news_story.php?news_id=1041

More publishers move towards CC-BY licence for OA articles. Research Information, 15 november 2012. Available from: http://www.researchinformation.info/news/news_story.php?news_id=1047

About these ads

Written by hbasset

November 16, 2012 at 8:34 pm

Posted in Journals, Science 2.0

Tagged with

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 38 other followers

%d bloggers like this: