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Things, not strings: will Google become semantic?

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A few words on the soft revolution  that might happen on the search giant…

The Google blog announces, at last, the release of some developments (known as Google Graph) that were studied by the R&D of Mountain View  for years.

The Knowledge Graph enables you to search for things, people or places that Google knows about—landmarks, celebrities, cities, sports teams, buildings, geographical features, movies, celestial objects, works of art and more—and instantly get information that’s relevant to your query. This is a critical first step towards building the next generation of search, which taps into the collective intelligence of the web and understands the world a bit more like people do. (…)

1. Find the right thing
Language can be ambiguous—do you mean Taj Mahal the monument, or Taj Mahal the musician? Now Google understands the difference, and can narrow your search results just to the one you mean—just click on one of the links to see that particular slice of results:

2. Get the best summary
With the Knowledge Graph, Google can better understand your query, so we can summarize relevant content around that topic, including key facts you’re likely to need for that particular thing. For example, if you’re looking for Marie Curie, you’ll see when she was born and died, but you’ll also get details on her education and scientific discoveries:

3. Go deeper and broader
Finally, the part that’s the most fun of all—the Knowledge Graph can help you make some unexpected discoveries. You might learn a new fact or new connection that prompts a whole new line of inquiry. 

We’ve always believed that the perfect search engine should understand exactly what you mean and give you back exactly what you want. And we can now sometimes help answer your next question before you’ve asked it, because the facts we show are informed by what other people have searched for.

We’ve begun to gradually roll out this view of the Knowledge Graph to U.S. English users. It’s also going to be available on smartphones and tablets…

Singhal, Amit. Introducing the Knowledge Graph: things, not strings. Google Blog, 16th of May 2012. Available from: http://googleblog.blogspot.fr/2012/05/introducing-knowledge-graph-things-not.html [Accessed 30th of May 2012]

Written by hbasset

May 30, 2012 at 5:43 pm

Posted in Tools

Tagged with , ,

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