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Posts Tagged ‘Google Scholar

Google Scholar: not reliable for citations counting

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According this study related to Social Sciences publications,  Google Scholar provides “vastly larger citation counts than either Scopus or Web of Science when all results are taken into account, but only slightly larger counts when only scholarly journals are considered“….

The study also deals with citation counting issue, saying  that “ it is relatively easy to falsify citing references to research and create “search engine spam” which artificially inflates citation countswithin Google Scholar. While it is unclear as to whether this is occurring deliberately and if so, towhat extent, it remains an issue which should engender cautious use of search engine citation data“.

As a conclusion the study says that ” Google Scholar may not be as reliable as either Scopus or Web of Science as a stand-alone source for citation data

Elaine M. Lasda Bergman. Finding Citations to Social Work Literature: The Relative Benefits of Using Web of Science, Scopus, or Google Scholar. The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Available online 23 October 2012

http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.acalib.2012.08.002

 

Written by hbasset

October 29, 2012 at 8:56 pm

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Reading: Is Google Scholar better than PubMed ?!

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According this study, PubMed searches and Google Scholar searches often identify different articles. In this study, Google Scholar articles were more likely to be classified as relevant, had higher numbers of citations and were published in higher impact factor journals.

Nourbakhsh, E., Nugent, R., Wang, H., Cevik, C. and Nugent, K. (2012), Medical literature searches: a comparison of PubMed and Google Scholar. Health Information & Libraries Journal, 29: 214–222.

http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1471-1842.2012.00992.x

Written by hbasset

August 27, 2012 at 4:20 pm

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Skepticism of Google Scholar is merited

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Skepticism of Google Scholar is merited. Google Scholar is lacking as a scholarly search tool because, first and foremost, it is not an abstracting and indexing service like the bibliographic databases frequently recommended by librarians. Those databases have literature indexed, often by humans, allowing it to be categorized with a controlled vocabulary and subject headings. Google Scholar is a search engine and as such it searches the full text, bibliographic information, and metadata of electronic documents. The computer programming that allows this to happen lacks the objective eye of a human indexer and, consequently, data is interpreted incorrectly and questionable sources pass through algorithms. Google Scholar’s methods of document retrieval are contrary to librarians’ understanding and expectation of information organization. Google Scholar’s inability or unwillingness to elaborate on what documents its system crawls and the uncertain quality of Google Scholar’s performance provides further reasons for information professionals and researchers to be wary of this tool, especially when so many quality databases exist and seem to sufficiently meet scientific information needs.

Gray, Jerry E. Scholarish: Google Scholar and its Value to the Sciences. Issues in Science and Technology Librarianship, Summer 2012. Available from: http://www.istl.org/12-summer/article1.html

Written by hbasset

August 24, 2012 at 8:26 pm

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To read: Is Google Scholar useful for bibliometrics?

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Aguillo, I.F.
Is Google Scholar useful for bibliometrics? A webometric analysis
(2012) Scientometrics, 91 (2), pp. 343-351.

Abstract

Google Scholar, the academic bibliographic database provided free-of-charge by the search engine giant Google, has been suggested as an alternative or complementary resource to the commercial citation databases like Web of Knowledge (ISI/Thomson) or Scopus (Elsevier). In order to check the usefulness of this database for bibliometric analysis, and especially research evaluation, a novel approach is introduced. Instead of names of authors or institutions, a webometric analysis of academic web domains is performed. The bibliographic records for 225 top level web domains (TLD), 19,240 university and 6,380 research centres institutional web domains have been collected from the Google Scholar database. About 63. 8% of the records are hosted in generic domains like. com or. org, confirming that most of the Scholar data come from large commercial or non-profit sources. Considering only institutions with at least one record, one-third of the other items (10. 6% from the global) are hosted by the 10,442 universities, while 3,901 research centres amount for an additional 7. 9% from the total. The individual analysis show that universities from China, Brazil, Spain, Taiwan or Indonesia are far better ranked than expected. In some cases, large international or national databases, or repositories are responsible for the high numbers found. However, in many others, the local contents, including papers in low impact journals, popular scientific literature, and unpublished reports or teaching supporting materials are clearly overrepresentedGoogle Scholar lacks the quality control needed for its use as a bibliometric tool; the larger coverage it provides consists in some cases of items not comparable with those provided by other similar databases.

http://www.springerlink.com/content/lrug235244u112rg/?MUD=MP

 

Written by hbasset

April 18, 2012 at 5:03 pm

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Google Scholar comes to metrics!

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Google Scholar Metrics for Publications

Sunday, April 1, 2012 | 3:00 AM

 

Most researchers are familiar with well-established journals and conferences in their field. They are often less familiar with newer publications or publications in related fields – there’re simply too many! Today, we’re introducing Google Scholar Metrics: an easy way for authors to quickly gauge the visibility and influence of recent articles in scholarly publications. 

To get started, you can browse the top 100 publications in several languages, ordered by their five-year h-index and h-median metrics. You can also search for publications by words in their titles. For example, [design], [international law], [salud], and [otolaryngology]. To see which articles in a publication were cited the most and who cited them, click on its h-index number.

Scholar Metrics currently covers many (but not all) articles published between 2007 and 2011. It includes journal articles only from websites that follow our inclusion guidelines as well as conference articles and preprints from a small number of hand-identified sources. For more details, see the Scholar Metrics help page.

Here is hoping Google Scholar Metrics will help authors worldwide as they consider where to publish their latest article.

http://googlescholar.blogspot.pt/2012/04/google-scholar-metrics-for-publications.html

Written by hbasset

April 2, 2012 at 7:09 pm

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Google Scholar for Bibliometrics???

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A new study, to be published into Scientometrics, shows that Google Scholar “lacks the quality control needed for its use as a bibliometric tool“.

Some findings:

  • universities from China, Brazil, Spain, Taiwan or Indonesia are far better ranked than expected
  • in some cases, the local contents, including papers in low impact journals, popular scientific literature, and unpublished reports or teaching supporting materials are clearly overrepresented

Aguillo, Isidro. Is Google Scholar useful for bibliometrics. A webometric analysis. Scientometrics, In press.
http://www.springerlink.com/content/lrug235244u112rg/

 

 

 

Written by hbasset

January 9, 2012 at 9:41 pm

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Laser medicine: Scopus and Pubmed are the best sources

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Summary
The four most popular search engines PubMed/MEDLINE, ScienceDirect, Scopus and Google Scholar are investigated to assess which search engine is most effective for literature research in laser medicine. Their search features are described and the results of a performance test are compared according to the criteria (1) recall, (2) precision, and (3) importance.
As expected, the search features provided by PubMed/MEDLINE with a comprehensive investigation of medical documents are found to be exceptional compared to the other search engines. 

However the most effective search engine for an overview of a topic is Scopus, followed by ScienceDirect and Google Scholar. 

With regard to the criterion “importance” Scopus and Google Scholar are
clearly more successful than their competitors.

All in all Scopus is the most effective search engine if one requires only an overview of the topic.  For a widespread and in-depth investigation in the area of life science and closely related topics, PubMed/MEDLINE is more  appropriate

Tober, Markus. PubMed, ScienceDirect, Scopus or Google Scholar – Which is the best search engine for an effective literature research in laser medicine? Medical Laser Application. Volume 26, Issue 3, August 2011,
Pages 139-144. Basic Investigations for diagnostic purposes
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1615161511000329

Written by hbasset

August 2, 2011 at 4:51 pm

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