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Posts Tagged ‘Library 2.0

Research Information (June/July 2012): again an amazing issue!

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Patients as partners: Reports from the Health 2.0 workshop held recently in Lyon, France
http://www.researchinformation.info/features/feature.php?feature_id=370

Patients as partners
David Stuart. Web 2.0 in libraries should be more than social media.
Dave explains the differences between social media and Web 2.0 and gives some clues to other avenues that still need to be explored by the library and information professional.
http://www.researchinformation.info/features/feature.php?feature_id=367
Michael Clarke. The need for semantics. Definition and role of semantics, and what is the future impact on journals publishing.
http://www.researchinformation.info/features/feature.php?feature_id=371
 David Armstrong. Does ‘commercial’ have to be a dirty word?. David defends the superiority of the golden Open Access model
http://www.researchinformation.info/features/feature.php?feature_id=369
Sian Harris. Opening up e-book access. Sian explains how the topic of Open Access e-book is emerging.
http://www.researchinformation.info/features/feature.php?feature_id=368

Written by hbasset

June 8, 2012 at 7:31 pm

Social metadata for libraries: an OCLC report

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Some OCLC members reviewed 76 sites relevant to libraries, archives, and museums that supported such social media features as

  • tagging,
  • comments,
  • reviews,
  • images, videos,
  • ratings, recommendations,
  • lists, links to related articles,
  • etc.

In addition, working group members surveyed site managers, analyzed the survey results and discussed the factors that contribute to successful—and not so successful—use of social metadata.

http://www.oclc.org/research/publications/library/2011/2011-02r.htm

Written by hbasset

October 7, 2011 at 7:45 pm

Posted in Uncategorized

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Online marketing for Libraries

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  • Be where users are!
  • Have a good address
  • Puch out to users as much information as possible


Houghton-Jan, Sarah. Be where users are: online marketing for libraries. Librarian in black, posted on October 13, 2010.
http://librarianinblack.net/librarianinblack/2010/10/marketing.html

Written by hbasset

October 19, 2010 at 8:06 pm

Posted in Science 2.0

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Best practices: SharePoint for your library

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The latest issue of Journal of Web Librarianship, Vol.4, Issues 2 & 3, 2010, gives 3 articles on how to use SharePoint for your library.

  • Organizational and social factors in the adoption of Intranet 2.0: A  case study/ by Kim, B.
    • This article presents a case study of the intranet implementation and adoption process of a SharePoint intranet at a small  academic library and investigates why the many Web 2.0 tools of the library intranet are currently underused. Staff interviews showed that common goals for an intranet, such as information dissemination, knowledge sharing, communication, and collaboration, are not necessarily easier to achieve when an intranet is equipped with Web 2.0 functionalities. The same level of thorough planning and organizational efforts required to make an intranet succeed before Web 2.0 is still necessary to realize the promise of Intranet 2.0
  • A point to share: Streamlining access services workflow through online collaboration, communication, and storage with Microsoft SharePoint/ by Diffin, J., Chirombo, F., Nangle, D., de Jong, M.
    • This article explains how the document management team (circulation and interlibrary loan) at the University of Maryland University College implemented Microsoft’s SharePoint product to create a central hub for online collaboration, communication, and storage. The team’s previously adopted tools to improve internal operations had been adequate but not optimal. Also, a long-standing and overarching concern about the potential loss of some or all of the document management knowledge base existed. These reasons prompted the team to carefully examine SharePoint as a prospective tool. It was hoped that this early scrutiny would prove beneficial in the long run by avoiding a repeat of earlier technology implementations’ shortcomings. The group quickly realized the software would not be a cure-all but felt the prospects were good that it would be useful and dependable. SharePoint was fully implemented with great success because of the team’s careful consideration of collaboration, communication, and storage needs
    • An unexpected ally: Using Microsoft’s sharepoint to create a departmental intranet / by Dahl, D.
    • In September 2008, the Albert S. Cook Library at Towson University implemented an intranet to support the various functions of the library’s Reference Department. This intranet is called the RefPortal. After exploring open source options and other Web 2.0 tools, the department (under the guidance of the library technology coordinator) chose Microsoft Windows SharePoint Services 3.0, a proprietary product, as their intranet platform. Various components of SharePoint fulfill the Reference Department’s needs, which include recording reference transactions, publishing policies and procedures, and sharing pertinent information at the reference desk. Several lessons and best practices have emerged since the department’s initial SharePoint implementation. A survey of reference staff indicates satisfaction with the RefPortal, but more training is needed for the portal to be used to its maximum potential.

Written by hbasset

September 14, 2010 at 6:00 pm

Posted in Science 2.0

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Library 2.0: a definitive overview

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A range of excellent presentations were givent at the latest IFLA2010, in Stockolm.
http://www.sub.su.se/ifla/program.htm

I like these ones:

Written by hbasset

September 8, 2010 at 5:40 pm

Posted in Web 2.0

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Library 2.0: an evolution, not a revolution

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Seventy-six librarians in Australia participated in a series of focus groups in support of research exploring the skills, knowledge and attributes required by the contemporary library and information professional in a world of ever changing technology.

Library 2.0 was broadly viewed by participants as being about change whilst librarian 2.0 was perceived by participants as not a new creation but just about good librarian practices.

Participants expressed the general belief that personality traits, not just qualifications, were critical to be a successful librarian or information worker in the future.

Participants perceived Library 2.0 as being an evolution and not a  revolution.

It is a refinement of what libraries have always done (i.e., provided an information service and attracted users to this service).

For this reason, the role of libraries has not changed, but the nature of the service being offered has. Participants noted that library 2.0 has heralded a change in the tools employed in libraries and used by both librarians and users.

This study has shown that librarian 2.0 has more to do with attitudes and traits than it does with technology.

Helen Partridge, Victoria Menziesa, Julie Leea and Carrie Munroa. The contemporary librarian: Skills, knowledge and attributes required in a world of emerging technologies. Library & Information Science Research, Volume 32, Issue 4, October 2010, Pages 265-271
Library and Information Science Research in Australia

Written by hbasset

September 6, 2010 at 5:02 pm

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Library 2.0: Good practices

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Good practices for integrating Web 2.0 tools in library services

1. Web 2.0 tools, such as blogs, RSS, social networking sites and Wikis, should be used with well-defined purposes and standard norms. This step will improve the reliability of Web 2.0 tools and improve the participation of patrons in activities of libraries.

2. Libraries may use podcasts and/or vodcasts whenever learning is based on audio or visual clues. Visual clips of the latest events may be provided as feeds over podcast. This step helps in marketing the libraries and improves their credibility in society.
3. Libraries should create blogs in order to cater to the needs of specific groups of patrons. However, the number of blogs should not be too high or else it will lead to scattering the users across the blogs with very low number of participants in each blog. The libraries can use blogs for announcing new developments and events. The blogs should be accessible to all, but comment may be added by authorized students only.

4. Libraries may publish guidelines for using various Web 2.0 tools. Students may be asked to respect intellectual property rights when referring to knowledge resources owned by others. Knowledge resources should be properly cited and credited. Students should also avoid posting any confidential information.

5. Visual clips, explaining various procedures and functions of the library, may be provide as vodcasts. The delivery of audio or video clips requires high-speed Internet connectivity. Audio/video clips of short size can be easily delivered by podcast/vodcast. The length of single audio/video clips is usually 3-5 min.

6. Lectures and demonstrations can be provided on podcast, so that students who have missed the lecture can watch at their convenience.

7. Web 2.0 tools are a new concept. In the initial phase of their studies, students should be trained to use various Web 2.0 tools. Small training modules should be used as the starting point.

8. Web 2.0 tools are community based learning applications; therefore, the support and participation of patrons is critical to the success of Web 2.0 tools. Students and faculty members should be taught to incorporate these tools in order to form an intellectual virtual community.

9. The libraries and information centers should create flyers and
bookmarks that contain brief information about blogs, RSS and Wikis
used in the library. These flyers should be distributed during orientation classes and informal visits to various departments. The library should provide links to Web 2.0 tools from university and library homepages. A brief introduction of activities offered using Web 2.0 tools and any updates should be placed on the library’s website or communicated
directly to students through flyers.

10. Libraries may create a Wiki account, where students and teachers can create content, providing users with an opportunity to contribute in the virtual community through Wiki. Henderson State University’s library has created a Wiki account, which includes “Student Discussion” and “Staff” sub accounts.

11. Wikis may be developed as subject guides. Wikis may offer guidance and explain general search tips about how to locate articles or books from the library.

12. The library should provide RSS feeds to communicate about scheduled
podcasts/vodcasts and events of the university, as well as new books that are added to the collection.

—————–

Adapted from:
Use of Web 2.0 tools in academic libraries: A reconnaissance of the
international landscape. Manorama Tripathia, ,  and Sunil Kumar. The International Information & Library Review, Volume 42, Issue 3, September 2010, Pages 195-207
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.iilr.2010.07.005

Written by hbasset

August 31, 2010 at 7:48 pm

Posted in Web 2.0

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